CALL US AT 1.866.756.2620

Tag Archive: Hireology

Adam Robinson

Recruiting Strategies to Attract Millennials

Business people waiting for job interview

By the year 2020, the U.S. workforce will be comprised almost entirely of millennials. What’s more, Generation Y is projected to account for 30 percent of new vehicle sales in 2016, and that number could double next year.

Millennials are much more apt to make a purchase from—or develop brand loyalty to—a company with whom they identify and are even more trusting of purchases from employees who are like them. As a result, companies must now clearly communicate their viewpoints and company culture to potential millennial customers, and perhaps most importantly, employ individuals who connect with that target audience.

Unlike previous generations, millennials care more about fulfillment from their careers and evaluate potential jobs on a number of factors that can cater to this need. To retain these workers, organizations must tailor internal positions and programs to meet the needs of this growing workforce demographic. Also, recruitment strategies must be updated accordingly, to attract the best candidates effectively.

Companies must first identify what millennials want. Here are key traits of what they look for in potential jobs, and how that plays a role in the recruitment process.

What Does Millennial Recruitment Mean for Dealerships?

The dealership model has been in play for decades with little to no change. But these days, millennials want to work for a company that is not only profitable but making a difference in society and providing them with perks that will fit into their personal lives. Millennial needs from employers include:

Income Reliability

Due to the challenges of making large student loan payments and covering basic living expenses, millennials as a demographic are not interested in a commission-based position where pay is unreliable. Rather, they are interested in a base pay plan that gives them the confidence of a guaranteed stream of income. In the auto industry, providing base salary positions in lieu of commission will not only attract better talent but can provide a better customer experience, as well.

Work Flexibility

Fewer millennials today believe in the 9-to-5 workday but prefer instead the flexibility to integrate their personal and professional lives. In an interview with Forbes, Chief Strategy Officer for the Intelligence Group Jamie Gutfreund stated that 88 percent of millennials consider how a potential job will cater to their work-life balance. While it may seem more challenging to provide scheduling flexibility in your dealership, there are a number of options that can work for your organization. Examples include running two shifts—9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 9 p.m.—and perks such as giving every other weekend off.  Some innovative dealerships have even moved to a “four days on, three days off” format where sales associates work four ten-hour workdays.

Clear Job Titles and Descriptions

Job descriptions and position titles must be updated for the millennial audience, highlighting the aspects that will fulfill their wants and needs. Outside of salaries and benefits, millennials are looking for a job with a higher purpose—one that makes them feel fulfilled. As a result, they are interested in companies focused on helping solve problems in society.

In addition, because millennials are still relatively early on in their careers, they want job titles and responsibilities to outline the scope of the work clearly. They are interested in learning as much as they can to advance in their careers and want to know if a company is willing to invest in them through ongoing training and development programs.

Lastly, when placing job openings online, be sure to use concise keywords and descriptors that your target audience will most likely type into search engines when looking for open positions to help better connect you with ideal candidates.

Consistent Communication

In addition to clear communication of job responsibilities, millennials are interested in real-time feedback on the job. Because they appreciate knowing where they stand, along with the opportunity to consistently learn, maintain engagement with them by providing periodic, consistent check-ins as opposed to an annual review.

A Bigger Picture

As mentioned, millennials consider a number of factors from a potential position so as to feel fulfilled, maintain a work-life balance, continue career advancement and align with a company’s values. In exchange for their productivity and devotion, millennials are looking at what a company can offer them not just in monetary compensation, but how a job will fit into their overall life and society.

Once you’ve successfully recruited top talent, it becomes imperative that your dealership retains that employee. This is a particular challenge with the Gen Y employee. In fact, according to a recent 2016 Gallup report, 21 percent of millennials have changed jobs within the past year—more than three times the number of other generations. This turnover is estimated to cost the U.S. economy $30.5 billion annually.

One of the biggest complaints millennials have is a lack of opportunities to move their career paths forward. One explanation for this is a company’s preference to hire externally rather than promote from within. Hiring from within is more cost efficient and provides your millennial employees the chance to further engage with, and invest in, your company.

Tailoring recruitment strategies to attract top talent to your workforce, and providing them with ongoing opportunities for advancement and support, will help ensure your millennial employees will connect with your company and provide loyalty and dedication for years to come.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2016/12/recruiting-strategies-to-attract-millennials/

Adam Robinson

How to Hire the Most Important Sales Role in Your Dealership: Service Advisors

NCM-CD-627

There is no question that a successful dealership has both skilled technicians and knowledgeable salespeople to maintain profit margins. But an oft-overlooked—and equally (or arguably even more) important—component is the service advisor.

When people take their cars to a dealership, the service advisor is the first face they see. The service advisor quarterbacks the entire service experience and serves as the critical link between the customer and the work. This dynamic means service advisors have a heavy influence on customer experience, which can either keep them coming back or drive them away.

While a basic understanding of how cars work is essential to helping the customer navigate their needs, communication skills are even more crucial in ensuring the customer has a positive experience and feels confident about the work and service your dealership provides. Critical conversations had between the advisor and customer include such topics as explaining invoices, deciphering warranty coverage, explaining necessary or suggested additional repairs and providing the customer with updates on the progress of the work. All these conversations require someone with good people skills as well as excellent car skills.

Here are the key elements I recommend to identify quality service advisor candidates and how to hire them.

Recognize the Traits of a Solid Service Advisor

As mentioned above, a service advisor is the first face your customer sees and the person with whom they communicate the most, if not exclusively, throughout their service experience. A good service advisor should possess the following traits:

Mechanical Knowledge and Ability to Articulate – Because the service advisor is the one to communicate with the customer from start to finish, it is important they understand the industry enough to be able to answer questions, suggest options and explain the process to a customer who may otherwise be unfamiliar with the work needed or performed. Additionally, the service advisor should be able to relay the information without overusing technical jargon, making it simple for every customer to follow and understand.
People Skills – The service advisor should have the ability to read and adapt to different customers’ communication preferences: some like a plethora of details while others prefer to be in and out. The service advisor must also possess good listening skills to clearly understand what the customer needs or wants and be able to relay that information correctly to the technicians doing the work.
Integrity – In addition to communicating information between customers and technicians, service advisors have a responsibility to provide the client with accurate information that is in their best interest, instead of using every interaction as an opportunity to upsell extra work. A service advisor with honesty and integrity will quickly earn the confidence of your customers, ensuring they look to your dealership as a trusted place of business, returning for additional needs and sending friends and family your way. Also, a good service advisor will provide updates or call customers back in a timely fashion, keeping them looped in every step of the way

Things to Consider When Hiring a Solid Service Advisor

Now that you know what to look for in a service advisor, there some factors to keep in mind when considering hiring one. For starters, consider how your dealership and employment brand will appeal to women candidates. Half of your customers are women, so having at least one female service advisor on staff will help you better connect with that demographic. Consider advertising the job with a title other than “service advisor,” so as to appeal to a larger number of applicants. Alternate titles can include customer service representative, service secretary or customer service associate. While technical knowledge is beneficial, you might consider advertising the position with “no experience required” to welcome applicants who have all the other necessary skills without potential bad habits that will require much more aggressive retraining to break. Lastly, consider the number of service advisors your dealership needs to meet demand to give your customers the full attention and service required.

Benefits of a Solid Service Advisor

Hiring the right individual for a service advisor position will yield lasting benefits, including an increase in repair order count, CSI and owner retention. It will also increase your technicians’ productivity, resulting in a boost of customer loyalty.

A service advisor typically touches a customer five times more than a sales person, making proper candidates for this position a crucial component for your dealership’s success. As new car sales are expected to plateau or decline next year, a stable of high-quality service advisors will keep your customers coming in for repairs and services. Preparing for 2017 means staffing up with skilled service advisors who can create a lasting, positive impact.

Thanks to NCM Associates’ content partner, Hireology, for sharing the guidance on employee referral programs. Learn more about Hireology. And join NCM’s experts for more actionable advice for hiring the best people for your team in our Hiring Top Talent and Success-Driven Pay Plans classes.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2016/11/how-to-hire-the-most-important-sales-role-in-your-dealership-service-advisors/

Kevin Baumgart

How to Improve Your Customer Experience with Better Employees

Businessmen talking

You never want your dealership to become infamous for poor customer service. No company wants that sort of stain on their brand image. And in today’s always-on, always-connected society, it’s incredibly easy for poor customer experiences to go viral and impact both sales and your brand image.

Comcast has a well-documented history of infuriating customers. If you recall this internet phenomenon from 2014, there was an encounter between a customer who was trying to cancel internet service and a Comcast employee who worked tirelessly to convince him otherwise. The recording of the conversation is painful to hear. Even a company as customer-centric as Amazon has been drawn into the crossfire through a poor customer experience during a live chat session where the customer was called the wrong name and gender throughout the encounter.

Needless to say, the internet is an unforgiving place in many respects when it comes to showcasing poor customer experiences. What’s more, a clear takeaway from each of these examples is that the individual employees have a significant role in shaping these experiences and perceptions as a whole.

With better employees, you’re able to make substantial progress towards creating a dealership culture and operational standard that consistently provides exceptional customer experiences.

How To Get Started with A Hiring Strategy

According to an article for Harvard Business Review, companies that effectively manage the entire customer experience see improved customer and employee satisfaction, stronger loyalty and higher revenue. From a hiring perspective, you need to implement a standardized process to select better quality employees who will provide your customers with a higher quality experiences.

Improving customer experiences doesn’t happen by addressing a single interaction with a customer—it involves everyone in your dealership. It’s truly a cultural shift, and one that needs to be reflected in the attitudes and core competencies of each and every employee.

With that in mind, here are a few qualities that you should look for in each candidate:

  • Listening abilities – In a customer service position, being able to focus your attention exclusively on the customer sometimes feels like a lost art—and like assessing artwork, trying to be objective about a person’s listening skills can be tricky when you’re not given the right tools. This is the type of soft skill that will likely present itself during a phone or in-person interview with job candidates. Take this opportunity to measure the accuracy of their responses to pointed questions, whether they talk over the interviewer and if their body language indicates they’re paying attention to you.
  • Empathy – Like listening skills, empathy is pretty difficult to judge unless you see a candidate in action. However, pre-screening tests and assessments can provide insight into whether a candidate will respond to a hypothetical situation in the right way. At the same time, you can ask open-ended questions that allow you to see whether the candidate exhibits empathy in response to a customer’s issues.
  • Technology literacy – While a great deal of customer experience management comes down to face-to-face human interaction and people skills, you need staff that understands how to get things done from a technical perspective. The kindest, most accommodating person in the world will still rub a car buyer the wrong way if he or she can’t point out specifications or talk about key vehicle features such as infotainment or Bluetooth connectivity with customers. Skills assessment tests are ideal for this sort of situation, providing you with an objective metric by which to score job candidates.

Understand Your Customers

At the foundation of your shift toward providing exceptional customer experiences is knowing your customer through and through. According to the annual J.D. Power and Associates Initial Quality Study, the number one thing new-car buyers look for when they’re selecting a specific model is reliability and durability. So, if your sales team member immediately starts off by how cool the customer will look in the vehicle, they may be getting off on the wrong foot—or, at least, isn’t addressing the customer’s priorities.

You need employees who have the listening skills, attitude and know-how to get to the bottom of what your customers want from the get-go. That means smarter hiring. Dealers with a process-driven approach are much more likely to find and hire quality candidates. In fact, 70% of our auto customer’s new employees hired through Hireology are rated as high-quality hires.

Take a data-driven approach to hiring that leverages skills assessments, pre-screening tools and interview checklists that help you objectively evaluate candidates.

Thanks to NCM Associates’ partner, Hireology, for sharing the guidance on employee referral programs. Learn more about Hireology. And join NCM’s experts for more actionable advice for hiring the best people for your team in our Finding Top Talent and Success-Driven Pay Plan classes.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2016/10/how-to-improve-your-customer-experience-with-better-employees/

Adam Robinson

3 Simple Steps to an Effective Employee Referral Program

Asian businessman making handshake with smiling face

Most business owners understand the importance of referrals when it comes to their customer base. According to a recent survey conducted by Harris Poll and Nielsen, 82 percent of Americans indicated they look for recommendations from friends and family members when they’re deciding on a purchase. Input happens organically, especially with big-ticket items like a vehicle when advice from trusted advisors is even more valuable.

Meanwhile, brands have tapped into the fact that incentives help facilitate the referral process. In fact, that same study found that 88 percent of American consumers said they would want to receive money, products or services, loyalty points and other reimbursements for promoting or referring a product over social media or email. By doing so, businesses can put themselves in a strong position to grow and generate new revenue through new customer acquisition.

Now, what does your employee referral program look like? As critical as new customers are for your dealership’s continued growth, your employees are equally important to your business’ sustained success.

An effective employee referral program allows you to tap into your talent and make them proxy recruiters. The foundational aspect of this approach to hiring is ensuring your existing employees are precisely aligned and identify with your company culture. In other words, they have the motivation to recommend a friend because they feel comfortable and appreciated at work and have a positive outlook of the business.

How to Build an Effective Employee Referral Program

Let’s assume your dealership’s company culture is in excellent condition, but your recruitment costs are exceeding what you had forecasted on a yearly basis—with average turnover rates for salespeople at 71 percent, this is a likely scenario.

With this in mind, here are three simple steps that will help you build a referral program that takes much of the headache out of recruiting:

1. Expectations

As you put your program policy down on paper, you have to begin with clearly defined objectives and expectations—both from an employer and employee’s perspective. As the business, you need to run an audit of your staffing needs and how to best optimize your referral program to bolster specific departments. Are there a few employees reaching retirement age in the sales or service departments? Has someone in billing and accounting recently relocated? Are you rebuilding your marketing team? Whatever your short- and long-term needs may be, these goals are critical to the strategic success of your referral program. If you’re already sitting on a large stack of high-quality resumes for salespeople, direct your referral efforts elsewhere.

At the same time, your employees need to know who qualifies as a referral. Can it be their high-school buddy? Should it be a former colleague? How about a friend or classmate from college? Can employees refer candidates who have already applied for a position? Another consideration for your referral program is who can recommend candidates. In many organizations, those at the highest levels—including vice president and above—or those directly involved in hiring decisions are restricted from making referrals.

2. Incentives

As mentioned above, participating in an employee referral program comes with the expectation of some reward. The extent to which you choose to compensate employees for their successful referrals may depend on the role. For instance, a management position may offer an incentive at a higher rate than an entry-level candidate. That’s up to the discretion of the dealership and how you assign value for each referral. However, having a consistent, documented incentive is a way to show your employees that you take the referral program seriously.

Another significant consideration with your incentives is timing. As an employer, it feels better to wait to reward the referring employee—especially monetarily—until the new hire proves themselves to be a successful member of the dealership staff. From an employee’s perspective, this sends a confusing mixed signal. On one hand, you trust their referral enough to hire the candidate; however, you don’t have confidence that the new hire will last. So, you withhold the reward until six to 12 months down the line. This policy produces a net loss in terms of employee engagement and culture. Consider a two-step process where you pay a portion of the financial incentive at the time of hire and deliver the remainder after the new employee proves themselves.

3. Process

If you truly want your employee referral program to get off the ground, you have to make it as simple and straightforward as possible. The fewer obstacles employees have to go through or around to make a referral, the better the results. If you want to take a bare bones approach, you can simply ask employees to email HR with a name and contact number for the referral. Or you may ask them to provide the candidate’s resume as well. Regardless, your employees aren’t the one applying for the open position, so avoid making the process that complicated.

No matter how simple you make the process of submitting referrals, an integral, ongoing step is consistent communication with staff. Make sure they know to whom they send referrals, and that they understand their role in the review process and the employment requirements through the onboarding stages—meaning some organizations require the referring employee to remain on staff throughout the first 30 days of employment. It’s also a smart idea to include a communication plan in the case you don’t hire the referral. If a candidate doesn’t meet the established requirements, you must clearly explain that so that your staff doesn’t perceive it as a slight against their recommendation.

What Employee Referrals Mean for Your Dealership

What would you think if you weren’t getting any customer referrals? Clearly, this is bad. One on hand, you likely have operational issues in one or more department that are keeping your clients from telling their friends and family to visit your dealership. On the other, you have to invest significantly more in other marketing channels that are an expense on your P&L sheet.

The same rules apply for your employee referral program. Forbes contributor Liz Ryan explained that if you’re not getting any referrals from your existing staff, it’s could signal a couple of issues:

  1. Your dealership’s culture is suffering. Your employees are telling you that they wouldn’t want their former colleagues and friends working at your dealership.
  2. Your existing referral program is filed away somewhere that hasn’t seen the light of day in the past 12 months. Nobody remembers this is even an option.

As a result, you have to increase your budget for job board advertisements and other recruitment channels to get the attention of prospective candidates. Either way, it’s not an ideal case.

An effective employee referral program doesn’t replace other recruitment strategies, but it certainly alleviates much of the strain—after you’ve put in the hard work to build a dealership culture where talented people want to work.

Thanks to NCM Associates’ partner, Hireology, for sharing the guidance on employee referral programs. Learn more about Hireology. And join NCM’s experts for more actionable advice for hiring the best people for your team in our Finding Top Talent and Success-Driven Pay Plan classes.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2016/09/3-simple-steps-to-an-effective-employee-referral-program/

Kevin Baumgart

The First 7 Days: Why Onboarding Millennials Is Critical to Employee Performance

Coffee Girl

With each passing day, dealerships have to reconcile the fact that they will need to hire an increasing number of Millennials. What does this mean exactly? Like any normal demographic shift, older Americans are retiring and younger generations are filling their positions.

The big differentiator between now and previous generations is that the incoming group is such a huge segment of the population. According to Pew Research, Millennials – those between 18 and 34 – now number more than 75 million in the U.S., pushing them past the next largest group: the Baby Boomers.

What Does the Millennial Shift Mean for Dealerships?

This is meaningful for your dealership for a number of reasons. First of all, Millennials are in the middle of a job-hopping trend that has been growing increasingly pronounced over the past decade. For example, research from LinkedIn found professionals who graduated between 1986 and 1990 average 1.6 jobs during their first five years in the labor market. Workers who graduated between 2006 and 2010 have an average of 2.85 jobs during the same timeframe.

On top of that, Millennials are pretty stark in their self-assessments of their level of preparedness for the workforce. Bentley University released a study that revealed Millennials give themselves a grade of C or lower on being prepared for their first jobs.

When you consider the ramifications of these trends, you have the chance to recognize the importance of an onboarding program that keeps employees engaged and less inclined to look for work elsewhere.

Make Onboarding a Competitive Advantage

Building a dealership with the right talent will extend into the overall positive performance of the business. Employee onboarding is a fundamental aspect of the overall engagement framework of a top-performing business. With Millennials taking up a growing segment of the overall talent pool, keeping new hires engaged early on is even more important.

Strictly concerning financial performance, having a formal employee engagement program can make all the difference. A recent report from Aberdeen Research found that companies that have programs aimed at building employee loyalty achieve a 15.5 percent year-over-year increase in annual revenue – compared to 12.3 percent for all other organizations (Link to PDF report).

Meanwhile, these top-performing organizations also generate higher annual revenues from customer referrals, and more of their sales team members achieve their annual quotas compared to companies that don’t have an employee engagement strategy.

How Are Companies Creating Impactful Onboarding Programs?

Consider the first week of a new employee’s time on the job. At the end of the first seven days, do they:

  • Have a clear sense of their role within your dealership?
  • Understand your organization’s culture and expectations?
  • Feel as though they are socially integrated?
  • Have confidence in their abilities to fulfill their responsibilities?
  • See a direction forward as they continue along their career path?

These questions can help you get started understanding whether your dealership has an effective onboarding program.

Here are a few tips to ensure you’re keeping Millennials engaged from the very start.

1. Limit Traditional Learning Strategies

It’s important to remember that onboarding is not the same as training. There are certain aspects that will cross over, but, in large part, your onboarding program should be squarely focused on integrating new hires into your dealership. Certainly, you should be taking the time to introduce company policies, benefits and other fundamental information for each new employee. However, your onboarding program should get Millennials out from behind a desk and next to a mentor within your dealership who they can shadow. This will enable them to get hands-on experience and information about the processes and practices that go on during a regular day.

2. Begin Employee Recognition Early

From the very beginning, your dealership should work on integrating ways to help Millennials feel that they’re making significant progress—and you have made the effort to recognize them for it. A recent article for the Society for Human Resource Management found there’s a growing trend among organizations to invest in social recognition tools. A simple “thank you” goes a long way with respect to encouraging engagement among new hires, especially when you’re using social platforms that enable a millennial workforce to do so quickly and conveniently.

3. Customize Their Experiences

Whether or not it’s a positive attribute, Millennials are known for their love of personalization. From their Spotify playlists to their Starbucks orders, customization is a central component of their daily lives. They expect this to transition to the professional world. For instance, it’s common for new staff members to get introductory materials, clothing and other items during their first few days on the job. By adding their name or including references to topics or trends they enjoy, you increase the likelihood that your new hires will have a positive outlook and impression of your dealership.

By understanding how Millennials approach their professional lives and careers, you put your dealership in a better position to create an effective onboarding program that will make your business more productive.

Remember that this generation is less loyal to their employers than previous ones, meaning your onboarding strategy is even more likely tied to the long-term success of your business than you may have originally thought.

Special thanks to NCM Associates’ partner, Hireology, for sharing their insights on onboarding process. Learn more about Hireology. And join NCM’s experts for more actionable guidance for hiring the best people for your team in our Finding Top Talent and Success-Driven Pay Plan classes.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2016/08/the-first-7-days-why-onboarding-millennials-is-critical-to-employee-performance/

Kevin Baumgart

Four Fundamental Steps for Hiring Product Specialists at Your Dealership

car salesman talking to young woman inside showroom

Our automotive customers have shared that employing product specialists helps improve customer experience and loyalty, while simultaneously lowering employee turnover. When executed well, everyone is better off—the dealership, from improved customer satisfaction; the new employee, with a clearly defined career path; and the customer, who drives off your lot happy and ready to refer their friends.

Why do you need this position? Today’s consumers are more informed than ever, and the traditional sales approach isn’t working like it used to. Customers don’t want a sales pitch when they come to the dealership—they’d rather leverage their own research to speed up the buying process and purchase their new vehicle as quickly as possible.

Traditional salespeople and this new breed of product specialists are not cut from the same cloth. This new group of jobseekers is harder to recruit and retain, forcing you to bring your recruiting A-game.

Step 1 – Learn what makes great product specialists

Based on data from Hireology’s Talent Coaches—our team who works with dealerships to help them recruit and hire great resources—there are several key factors to look for when hiring a product specialist:

  • New to the industry: You want your employees to be molded by your system, not bringing bad habits into your dealership.
  • Ability to be a sponge: If they know nothing about the car business, then they must be prepared to absorb information and put it to immediate use.
  • Comfort with technology: New specialists should have the ability to learn the multitude of vehicle features and convey them to the customer in a digestible manner.
  • Puts customer needs first: Successful product specialists do what it takes to make the customer happy and find the car that’s right for them.

When we look outside the auto industry for product specialists, we create a near-limitless supply of job seekers. As long as a candidate has the fundamental building blocks for success, he or she could be the exact employee you’ve been seeking.

Step 2 – Discover the best candidates

Dealership executives must know how to find and recruit preferred talent when it comes to building a team of product specialists—which means sourcing your candidates. You need proactively to determine where you want to locate top talent. Think about using job boards such as Indeed.com, Glassdoor, LinkedIn and Snagajob so you can source candidates from the world’s best job sites.

Hireology’s Talent Coaches also recommend attending college career fairs and to build a strong social media presence for your dealership. Include on your dealership’s Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter pages such information as company culture, career opportunities and employee reviews. This helps ensure your dealership remains present within this ever-growing channel for job seekers.

Keep in mind that it’s important to have all your employees share this information and motivate them to want to share it. Otherwise, your social media efforts will seem forced or manufactured.

Here’s our breakdown for candidate discovery:

  • Publish jobs to the most effective job boards
  • Share positions using your social media accounts
  • Transform your website into a customizable job site
  • Use mobile-friendly job applications
  • Apply candidate pre-screening surveys
  • Create an employee referral program

Step 3 – Attract the right talent

There are two critical factors for attracting qualified candidates to fulfill your product specialist roles—the job post (which includes a job description) and the career site.

Most young job seekers aren’t actively considering traditional auto sales as a career option, so highlight the fact that you’re hiring for a product specialist position to drive more interest in the millennial market. Let job seekers know this fundamental difference in the job description and post.

Here’s an example format to follow when creating a Product Specialist job description:

Job Title: Product Specialist

Company: Jon Doe Automotive

DEALERSHIP AND ROLE: Be sure you tell applicants why your dealership is a great place to work and why this is a fantastic role within the company. Describe these vital details in a paragraph or two before you mention the benefits, responsibilities and qualifications.  This step is critical to developing their interest and drawing them in to apply.

BENEFITS: Add any benefits that your dealership may offer for employees, such as 401K, medical and dental insurance, paid time off and other perks.

RESPONSIBILITIES: Have bullet points listing all essential daily tasks, duties and any other obligations that are needed to be a top-performing product specialist at your dealership.

QUALIFICATIONS: List all things that require a product specialist to thrive to at the job, such as ideal personalities, skill sets and anything else you would consider needed in a qualified dealership employee.

Click here to get Hireology’s sample product specialist job description that will drive applicants.

Take advantage of a career site:

Updating the dealership career site is indispensable when attracting today’s product specialist job seekers. Design, word choice and other essentials play a major role in attracting applicants and top talent. Don’t let a non-existent or old careers page slowly fading on your website get in the way of finding great product specialists. Be sure you’re utilizing a streamlined career site so you can attract quality talent to your dealership. 

Step 4—Interview (twice), Verify and Hire

After you build your talent pool with a number of candidates, it’s time to interview your top choices for your product specialist positions. Starting this process with a phone interview is the best way to weed out the best candidates from the other applicants. From there, it’s highly recommended to conduct in-person interviews with the preferred candidates so you can get a better feel of who these people are and whether or not they might be qualified to work at your dealership. Lastly, before you make your hiring decisions, it’s always best practice to verify your candidates via background and reference checks.

Here are some tips on each phase of the process, so you can make sure you’re hiring qualified employees:

The Phone Screen—To get a better sense of who the applicant is, make sure you ask about his or her careers plans, their generals likes and dislikes, and their job history. Finish up the call by providing any information you have about your open product specialist role. Phone screens are an excellent way to save time by weeding out less qualified candidates and focusing on in-person interviewing only those that are qualified.

The Face-to-face Interview—These interview questions are different compared to the phone screen. Use this time when to learn more about the candidate and measure his or her work behaviors and personality. Skill assessment tests are the best way to gauge fully how qualified a candidate is for the job and are highly recommended.

Verification—The last step of any good interview process contains background and reference checks. There are easy ways to complete these processes without having to spend extra time on your end; be sure to do your due diligence when researching preferred vendors.

Wrapping Up: Product Specialists are the Future

The sales team structure at dealerships is changing. More dealerships are finding success with product specialists: their recruiting efforts are improving, their customer satisfaction is improving and their overall business is on the right path for thriving in today’s market.

Don’t let your dealership fall behind your competition when hiring new sales employees, especially on the product specialist end. It’s time to start employing product specialists so you can improve customer experience and loyalty, as well as achieve the hard-to-reach goal for every dealership—lower turnover.

Special thanks to NCM Associates’ partner, Hireology, for sharing the results of their study. Learn more about Hireology.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2016/07/four-fundamental-steps-for-hiring-product-specialists-at-your-dealership/

Kevin Baumgart

Does Your Dealership Value its Interview Process?

Businessmen talking

By the time a candidate reaches the interview stage, it’s clear they have grabbed your attention as a potential hire for your dealership. The interview process is an irreplaceable component of your dealership’s overall hiring strategy. It’s also the point at which both the employer and job seeker determine if it’s worth their time to move forward with the process.

What’s at Stake for Employers?

Taking the time to speak with a candidate in person is critical to determine if someone is a good fit for the role. It’s also an integral part in persuading top talent to work for your dealership.

Research from LinkedIn found that 87 percent of job seekers said a great interview experience would make them reconsider a job offer even if they have initial doubts. In a competitive job market, this can make the difference between hiring an all-star and a dud.

Conversely, 83 percent of candidates say a negative encounter during an interview will erode their interest in a position. Getting the interview process down to a science begins far in advance of the in-person visit.

Employer Due Diligence

You will want to use the early stages of the hiring process to get as much information about the applicant as possible to ensure you’re making the right decision by inviting them in for an interview. Hiring technology has come a long way in enabling auto dealers to evaluate job seekers before they ever step foot in the dealership.

Employers should take advantage of tools that test hard skills, soft skills, culture fit and aptitude. Based on the results of these evaluations, you’re able to better gauge whether they meet—or even exceed—the requirements established in your job description. This adds insight that employers can use in conjunction with resumes and applications to make informed judgments about applicants and if they should bring them in for an interview. Once you’ve completed these critical steps, you need to make sure you are prepared to meet the candidate in-person.

How to Prepare for the Interview

No detail is too small as you prepare for the interview. Consider what type of impression you’ll leave after you’ve invited a candidate to talk about a specific position and you forget their name, the job they applied for or refer to past work experiences belonging to another applicant. This is the candidate’s first impression of what it would be like to work at your dealership, it’s important to get it right.

You should also have your interview questions prepared in advance and in front of you when you sit down for the interview. Be sure to have questions that will help you effectively identify whether the candidate can perform all necessary tasks defined in the job description. Addressing your priorities upfront and asking questions about measurable criteria will help you determine their ability to do well in the role.

At the end of an interview is a great time to allow candidates to ask questions and helps set expectations for the candidate and the interviewer. If you are prepared for this exchange in advance, it is easier to sell top talent not just on the role, but also on your dealership as a place to work. As much as the employer is judging the candidate, the potential new hire is also forming opinions about working for the dealership, and a great impression will win over all-star candidates.

An Extensive Process

The interview is the singular component in hiring that carries the most weight for both the employer and candidate. It’s crucial that you have a rock-solid process in place—built on strong intel about each applicant—that will make the encounter productive and illuminating for all parties involved.

Special thanks to NCM Associates’ partner, Hireology, for sharing their insights on the interview process. Learn more about Hireology. And join NCM’s experts for more actionable guidance for hiring the best people for your team in our Finding Top Talent and Success-Driven Pay Plan classes.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2016/06/does-your-dealership-value-its-interview-process/

Adam Robinson

Recruitment Best Practices from DrivingSales’ Most Valuable Insight Competition

Snip20141006_4

Recently, Hireology was fortunate to speak and present at the DrivingSales Presidents Club 2016 event as a finalist for the Most Valuable Insight Awards. As a way to share our “most valuable insight,” Hireology presented the findings from an in-house study on how effective employment branding drives quality hires and improved store performance at dealerships. After conducting our research, we found something to be true across all retail automotive dealerships: employment brand matters.

Strong employment branding, when combined with a data-driven evaluation process, is one of the best investments a dealership can make. When dealerships build a strong employment brand and utilize procedures to manage the recruiting and hiring effort, the results are staggering.

How we did this study

(Short on time to read? Jump to the results and learn how to use them.)

While conducting our research, Hireology studied two control groups (for easy reference, I’ll refer to these as “Group A” and “Group B”). Group A consisted of a six-rooftop dealer group from the Mid-Atlantic region, and Group B was composed of a three-rooftop group located in the Midwest. Management teams were surveyed electronically, which covered their approach to employment branding and recruitment process as well as their results from such efforts.

Before diving into the results, let’s take a look at some of the industry-wide data related to human capital:

Therefore, we anticipated a correlation between the way dealerships present themselves as employers to today’s younger workforce online and the harmful effects of their staff turnover.

What we found: A branded career site yields better candidates

Our survey exposed numerous challenges facing the automotive industry when it comes to finding and hiring employees. Hireology discovered that there was a clear difference between utilizing job boards and a company career site when it comes to recruiting talent. Here are our results.

1 copy

Applicant conversion by source

We analyzed the rate at which inbound page traffic to Group A’s career page converted into candidate applications and found that conversion rates from organic traffic delivered as a result of a branded career site substantially over-performed the conversion rates generated from paid job board traffic:

  • 0.2% conversion rate from job boards
  • 11.5% conversion rate from organic traffic

Candidates by source

In this analysis, “candidate” is defined as someone who has applied for an open position via the career site and who has been deemed qualified at the first review so that a next step, such as an interview, is warranted. What Hireology found was that nearly 94% of candidates who applied for an open job were attributable to a paid job board, versus organic traffic due to a career site.

  • 6.1% career site
  • 93.8% job boards

Hires by source

Our analysis of Group A data showed that 77% of all hires resulted from organic traffic generated by the dealer’s career site versus job boards. This insight, when examined against conversion rate and candidate source data, shows that even though organic traffic attributable to a dealer career site generated just 6% of all candidate traffic, the career site cohort produced a whopping 77% of all hires. In other words, 6% of traffic generated 77% of hires.

  • 22.7% job boards
  • 77.3% career site

4

Quality of hires by source

Our analysis defined “quality hire” as “a hire who was able to meet or exceed 75% of their states production or performance target.” In sales roles, this might be a monthly vehicle unit sales quota. When controlling for the candidate source, 75% of all “quality hires” originated from the candidate pool generated via organic career site traffic. Just 25% of Group A’s quality hires came from a paid job board.

  • 25% job boards
  • 75% career site

Turnover percentage by source

Most importantly, the results show that turnover rates diverge substantially based on the cohort. The new variable ops hires that originated from a candidate attributable to a branded career site turned over at a rate two-thirds less than the industry average.

  • 25% from Group A
  • 72% industry average

Group B (Three-rooftop control group—Midwest)

5

For this second control group, we similarly analyzed the rate at which inbound page traffic to Group B’s career page converted into candidate applications. Hireology found that conversion rates from organic traffic delivered as a result of a branded career site substantially over-performed the conversion rates generated from paid job board traffic.

Applicant conversion by source

We examined the rate at which inbound page traffic to this dealership group’s career page converted into candidate applications and found that conversion rates from organic traffic delivered as a result of a branded career site significantly over-performed the conversion rates that came from paid job board traffic:

  • 1% came from job boards
  • 13% came from the dealership’s career site

Candidates by source

In this analysis of Group B data, we defined “candidate” as someone who has applied for an open position via the career site and is a qualified applicant warranting a next step, such as an interview. Hireology found that nearly 82% of candidates who applied for an open position were attributable to a paid job board, compared with organic traffic due to a career site.

  • 82% job boards
  • 18% career site

Hires by source

Our analysis of the data showed that 71% of all hires resulted from organic traffic generated by the dealer’s career site versus job boards. When evaluated along with conversion rate and candidate source data, we concluded that even though organic traffic attributable to a dealer career site generated just 18% of all candidate traffic, this cohort produced a whopping 71% of all hires made. In other words, 18% of traffic generated 71% of hires.

  • 29% job boards
  • 71% career site

6

As previously mentioned, Hireology defined “quality hire” as “a hire who was able to meet or exceed 75% of their states production or performance target.” When controlling for the candidate source, 70% of all “quality hires” came from the candidate pool generated via organic career site traffic; only 30% of quality hires resulted from a paid job board.

  • 30% job boards
  • 70% career site

Turnover percentage by source

What’s essential here is that the results show that turnover rates deviate significantly based on the cohort. The new variable ops hires that came from a candidate attributable to a branded career site turned over at a rate that’s nearly 50 percent less than the industry average.

  • 21% from Group B
  • 70% industry average

A branded career site for improves hiring and turnover

So, what’s the value in having a branded career site for your dealership? Here are four things to consider:

  1. Organic applicant traffic and process is over 5x more cost-effective
    1. Organic cost-per-hire: $245
    2. Third-party sources cost-per-hire: $1,700
  2. Organic applicant traffic and process yields the majority of hires—20% of the traffic yields 80% of the hires
  3. Hires sourced this way are 2.5x more likely to be an A or B player
  4. Hires sources this way have higher retention rates—
    1. 27% versus 67% industry average

Key takeaways for dealers

Retail automotive dealers who want to build better teams and reduce turnover should invest in employment branding and adopt a data-driven hiring process. The financial benefits of such an approach far surpass nearly all potential operational improvements through which dealers can generate a return on investment.

Assuming your dealership has 55 employees (the average) and a turnover of 67% per year, turnover is costing you nearly $600,000 per year, every year.

                        37 turns (67% x 55) @ $16,000 cost-per-turnover ea.  = $592,000

Based on our study, dealerships can anticipate dramatic changes in turnover after adopting a structured hiring process and creating a branded career site. As soon as you produce a turnover rate similar to the cases studies discussed above (i.e., 25%), your dealership turnover calculation would improve:

                        14 turns (25% x 55) @ $16,000 cost-per-turnover ea. = $224,000

That’s a profit add-back of $368,000 per store per year. Dealers are hard-pressed to figure out a more straightforward way to generate a higher return in this amount of time.

The bottom line is that dealers must take charge of the hiring challenge by taking control of the recruitment process. Strong employment branding, when combined with a data-driven evaluation process, is one of the best investments a dealership can make.

If you’re not already taking this approach, it might be time to reconsider the way your dealership hires employees because your employment brand most definitely matters.

Special thanks to NCM Associates’ partner, Hireology, for sharing the results of their study. Learn more about Hireology.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2016/05/recruitment-best-practices-from-drivingsales-most-valuable-insight-competition/

Kevin Baumgart

Tech Enabled Dealerships Need Tech-Savvy Employees

Young Woman on Phone

What do Millennials and technology mean for the future of your auto dealership? The truth of the matter is that you’re going to need both if you want to remain competitive in today’s industry.

The Impact of Technology on Auto Dealerships

One of the biggest changes that is forcing dealerships to shift the way they sell cars is customer behavior. According to an article from Fortune magazine, customers now make fewer than two visits (1.9 to be exact) to a dealership before making a purchase.

Online shopping is the main culprit. Because of the free flow of information on the Web, car buyers are more inclined to research their auto purchases at home or on the go using their computers and mobile devices. They’re no longer so dependent on salespeople for information about specific cars. As a result, some auto dealerships are equipping their sales team with greater technology, like tablets, to facilitate customer interactions and close deals in the showroom.

Unfortunately, you can’t just arm your sales team with tablets and expect them to be effective at selling in a new way. This is a significant shift, and your employee base has to be comfortable with approaching the customer and engaging them with a piece of technology. Most Dealers are targeting Millennials to work on the sales floor for this reason alone.

There are many benefits to having technology on the floor accompanied by tech-savvy employees:

  • It gives the sales team instant access to information when customers have questions to which they may not know the immediate answer
  • It initiates the sale on the floor instead of having to wait until customers are in the back office
  • It helps build early credibility and trust if your customer sees the employee as a reliable source
  • It will improve the level of professionalism and drive positive impressions of the store

Providing a mix of access to this type of technology and tech-savvy employees is one way that auto dealerships can remain competitive.

Millennials are a Perfect Fit for Technology Enabled Dealerships

While the common stereotype you see of Millennials is a group of people who constantly have their smartphones at the ready or are scrolling through their preferred social media feeds, this generation is exceptionally adept at technology. They were born into an era of innovation that made digital technology one of the primary ways people experience the world.

As a result, the generation has been groomed to reach for technology—mobile devices in particular—when searching for the answers to questions. According to the Society of Human Resource Management, Millennials are highly collaborative and make research-driven decisions.

What’s more, according to a recent study from PricewaterhouseCoopers, 78 percent of Millennials believe that access to technology makes them more effective in their roles at work (Link to the study; pdf warning.) Thus, the technology your auto dealership implements is a major contributing factor when Millennials are considering employers. In fact, 6 in 10 Millennials say the quality of technology a business has was important during recruitment.

However, it’s increasingly likely that Millennials will utilize their personal technology if the tools they have in the workplace limit them. Meanwhile, employers are also creating or updating their IT policies to adapt to Millennials’ technology needs—for instance, providing smartphones as an employee benefit.

Technology and Millennials go hand in hand, especially at your dealership. Whether it’s informed consumers arriving at your dealership with buying research saved on their smart devices or tech-savvy employees who understand your customers, technology surrounds this generation and is paramount to delivering a positive buying experience.

What steps have you taken to attract Millennials to your dealership? Have they worked?

Special thanks to our partners at Hireology for their insights on recruiting Millennials for the automotive workplace.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2016/04/tech-enabled-dealerships-need-tech-savvy-employees/

Adam Robinson

The Three Components of a Strong Employment Brand

Snip20150316_4

Auto retailers spend a fortune building their consumer brand. In the hyper- competitive world we live in, your local brand is one of the most valuable assets you control. A strong brand establishes the credibility, good will, and trust that buyers want when purchasing a car.

But what about your employment brand?

Your brand as an employer really matters. It’s the way that your local market’s talent pool perceives your organization as a potential employer. And make no mistake, you’re competing with other businesses for the best talent to staff your stores. Just like a strong consumer brand, a strong employment brand can differentiate you from the dealer down the street, and land you the best candidates. A weak or nonexistent employment brand all but ensures that you’ll be interviewing your competitors’ cast-offs.

The best demonstration of your employment brand is your career website. It’s a well-established fact that consumers are shopping online for hours before raising their hand and asking you for information about a particular vehicle. But did you realize that these same consumers are doing the exact same thing when considering whether or not to apply to your open job?

You’ve invested time and money getting your dealer site to a point where it’s producing leads, and your career site needs the same attention to detail to attract great job candidates. In addition to impacting applicant quality, your career site has real financial consequences. Chances are that you’re spending a lot of money on job boards and employment ads, but you can’t recoup that investment if you’re not directing those leads to a strong career site that speaks to your candidate pool.

To see an example of what I’m talking about, Schomp Automotive out of Denver, Colorado absolutely nails it. Check out one of the best career sites in the industry at http://careers.schomp.com. (Full disclosure: they’re a Hireology customer)

Here’s a fun exercise: open up a new tab in your internet browser and bring up your dealership’s website. Now, find the section of your site where a job candidate would research your business and apply for a job and ask yourself how your employment brand stacks up against these three critical success factors:

Can I easily submit an application?

Think about your digital marketing programs that are focused on your market’s consumer base. How much information do you ask of them in order for them to submit a lead? Pretty much a name and email address, I’m guessing? And you know the reason why: the more fields on a leads form, the fewer leads you get.

 

It’s no different with online job applications. The experience is everything. If you’re asking applicants to give you their name and email address along with a resume, then you’re in good shape. If you’re asking your applicants to completely re-create their resume on an online web form with dozens of fields, then you’re making it much, much harder to apply for the job than it needs to be.

Our research shows a nearly linear correlation between fields on an online job application and the conversation rate of traffic to form submissions. We strongly recommend keeping online job applications to 8 fields or less. Like car buyer leads, the point is to generate interest and make contact; if you’re running an effective interview process you’ll have plenty of opportunity to fully vet candidates.

Does it work on a mobile phone?

You know that you’re really missing the boat if your consumer site doesn’t render well on a mobile device, but did you realize that in 2015, 50% of all candidate traffic in the US and Canada originated on a mobile device?

That means that if a candidate can’t open your careers page on a mobile phone, you’re throwing away half of your applicant traffic, drastically restricting your access to the strongest candidates in your local job market, not to mention wasting half of your investment in recruiting.

Go ahead, try researching jobs at your store from your phone. How’s the experience? Ask yourself: if I were looking for a job, does my dealership make this experience a good one? If the answer is anything other than “yes,” you’ve got work to do.

Does it tell a compelling story?

The labor market is as tight as it’s been in a decade, and you no longer have the luxury of being undisciplined when it comes to attracting the best talent. Job seekers, especially the 50% of the workforce that’s made up of GenY, want to work for an employer that provides a great working environment and a defined career path.

A career site is more than a listing of open jobs – it needs to build excitement and reflect your company’s history, culture, community involvement, and employee quality of life. Ask yourself: does your career site explain the professional growth potential for a new employee? Does it tell the story of who you are and what you stand for?  Does it give me a compelling reason to want to work for you?

With these best practices in mind, take another look at the Schomp site from earlier. Take note of how they’ve built a site that supports any device, streamlines the application process, and has mastered the art of telling their own story. The site clearly shows potential applicants all the reasons why Schomp is an employer of choice. If I’m shopping for a job, Schomp presents a compelling case for why they deserve my time and attention.

It’s time for dealers to treat their employment brand with the same level of rigor and quality control that they do their consumer brand. In these increasingly competitive and uncertain times, the difference between your success or failure may very well rest on your ability to hire and retain great people. Great people want to work for great companies; make sure that your employment brand meets today’s standards.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2016/02/the-three-components-of-a-strong-employment-brand/