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Tag Archive: Advertising

Jody DeVere

Socially Conscious Brands Win with Women

Optimistic Female In Car

Auto dealers continue to increase their level of giving to charitable causes, according to a recent survey data from the National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) and Ally Financial.

More than 70 percent of new-car dealers surveyed in September 2014 said they increased their charitable giving in 2014, up from 65 percent last year. About 43 percent of dealers said they expect to increase their contributions again in 2015.

The bulk of this giving is staying in dealer’s local communities, as nearly 90 percent of dealers said their contributions go to supporting community service and local organizations. More than 65 percent of dealers surveyed said they organize staff volunteerism opportunities in their community.

Women consumers view their role in creating social and environmental change as extending well beyond the cash register. Companies can serve as a catalyst for sparking donations, volunteerism and advocacy by giving consumers a spectrum of ways to get involved.

Partnering with women consumers in this way can serve as both a reputation and bottom-line builder.

Cause Marketing Wins with Moms:

    95% find cause marketing acceptable.

    92% want to buy a product supporting a cause.

    93% are likely to switch brands.

    61% of purchased more cause-related products in the past year.

Source: Cone Cause Evolution Study, 2010

According to a study by Research International Ltd., 86% of consumers are more likely to buy a product associated with a cause or issue. About two thirds of Americans have a greater degree of trust in companies aligned with social issues. 64% of consumers feel companies should make cause-related marketing a part of their standard business practices.

Women are more likely than men to believe that supporting causes creates a sense of purpose and meaning in one’s life, makes them feel good about themselves and enhances the feeling of belonging to a community. Men and women are generally in agreement when it comes to which particular causes they choose to support.  For both, feeding the hungry and supporting our troops are among those that rank the highest, and as expected, gender-related health issues like breast cancer and prostate cancer are significantly more likely to be supported by women and men, respectively. 

Women Are Strongest Believers in the Power of Supporting Causes

8 in 10 American women believe that supporting causes creates a sense of purpose and meaning in life; and feel everyone can make a difference through their support.

Women Support Companies that Support Causes

Cause marketers often target the female demographic with campaigns, and with good reason

survey results confirm that American women are significantly more likely than men to show their support of a cause by purchasing products or services from companies who support the cause.

*Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide and Georgetown University’s Center for Social Impact

Communication findings are part of the larger Dynamics of Cause Engagement study.

Millennials: A Critical Cause Demographic

Millennials, more than Non-Millennials, prefer active engagement in cause campaigns, such as volunteering their time (31% versus 26%), cause-support purchasing (37% versus 30%), encouraging others to support a cause (30% versus 22%), and participating in fund-raising events (27% versus 16%). Thirty-seven percent of Millennials report being drawn to products co-branding with cause campaigns where their purchase is a form of support. 

American Millennials: Deciphering the Enigma Generation.

Top areas women support most as volunteers and with charitable donations:

1. Health care charities related to women, children or family support.

2. Local youth & family services

3. Education

4. Preserving the environment

5. Arts, culture, or ethnic awareness

6. Help people in need of food, shelter, or other basic necessities

7. Improving neighborhoods and communities

Who you partner with as a charity makes a difference with women on her purchase decisions,  your reputation, positive word of mouth and your local market reach.

Tip: Visit Charity Navigator http://www.charitynavigator.org/ to review charities before you partner with them to determine the charity reputation and how funds are being utilized.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2015/11/8028/

Jonathan Dawson

The Five Ingredients of a Personal Brand

Personal Brand

You should know by now that you need to brand yourself. (If not, then read my last article!) For a salesperson, branding simply means doing a few things to separate yourself from all the other sales people in your field, and even at your store. But how do you start developing a personal brand? There are five basic brand elements or “ingredients” you should consider implementing:

The first ingredient is a nickname.

I know we all like to think our name is memorable, but the sad truth is that people forget names all the time. Common names, unique names, short names, long names – Your customers WILL forget your name unless you give them something else to remember.

Consider using a nickname instead of your name. My student Nate Allen goes by the nickname of the “Official Singing Salesman.” As you’ve probably guessed, he likes music and enjoys performing custom made songs for his customers at the dealership. Just think about it. If someone told you to go in and ask for the Official Singing Salesman, how likely are you to forget it?

The second ingredient is a slogan.

A salesman in Atlanta uses the slogan “You will get the royal treatment.” The slogan goes with his nickname, ”King Stinson.” Imagine customers telling their friends, “Go see King Stinson and he will give you the royal treatment!” This is unique and is not something customers will easily forget.

The third ingredient is a logo or imagery.

Creating unique business cards, key chains, bracelets, or buttons that have your brand image on them is a fantastic way to become unforgettable. My student Monti Hansard uses pigs with purple wings as her brand image. She has them on her custom business cards, her personal vehicle, and on her desk. Everyone knows to come in and ask for the lady who loves pigs.

The fourth ingredient is having your own website.

For example, check out KevinTheJeepGuy.com. You’ll see that Kevin uses this website to share his story, customer testimonials, and contact information. Having your own personal website means you have a central place where customers can learn about you, your brand, and your product.

The fifth ingredient is color.

Bill Stout from Wichita uses gold and black as his brand colors. He’s a fan of the Wichita State University basketball team and uses their colors for his brand. He will only wear gold and black and uses these colors for his website and business cards. He calls his desk a “shrine to WSU.”

I know it’s overwhelming to figure out what your brand should be, but the key to developing a brand is to start small. Do not add all five ingredients at the same time. Instead, start with just one idea, such as a nickname. As you get comfortable with one ingredient, start adding more over time.

Here are a few questions to help you get started:

  • Is there something interesting or unique about you that people tend to notice or comment on?
  • Which one of these five elements immediately resonated with you?
  • What would be a unique way for your customers to remember you?
  • What could you have fun with?

I believe that spending time and effort on developing a brand will produce better results than begging customers to buy from you.


Upcoming NCM Institute course: Principles of Service Management Mastery, October 28-29 in Kansas. City. Click the banner for details.

service_mgmt

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2014/10/the-five-ingredients-of-a-personal-brand/

Russell Grant

How to Motivate Your Customers: It’s a Gift

travel-incentivesAs I travel the country speaking to dealers, there are several questions that have come up consistently in the 20 years I have been in this business.

One of them is: “Why do I need to give something away to get people into my dealership, especially if they’re already my customers? I don’t want a bunch of gift seekers at my dealership.”

While there are a number of reasons why gifts are a strategic part of a successful marketing campaign, I want to share with you the three most important:

  1. Law of Reciprocation. We all know that if we do something for somebody they will feel obligated to do something in return. This doesn’t mean someone will buy a car out of obligation, but it does mean if you get that customer to your showroom they may take a test drive—or be more generous with the time they give you at the dealership.
  2. Motivation. Just because someone is interested in purchasing a vehicle doesn’t mean they’re coming to your dealership any time soon. By offering them a gift, it motivates your customer to take action now. This way, your marketing gives customers a reason to respond when you want them to, which is often much earlier than they would have without your offer.
  3. Proven Results. At J&L Marketing, we have been tracking marketing results for 22 years and the results are overwhelmingly stronger for campaigns that use a gift versus those that do not. Also, dealerships that highlight their gift in marketing materials receive a better response rate and experience the high quality traffic they’re looking for. The best approach is to make your offer first and then motivate the customer to take action with a gift.

Be Strategic With Your Offers

Premiums/Gifts should have a higher perceived value than their actual cost. However, be careful. They should not be a gimmick.

Trip incentives are a great way to motivate the customer with something they may not be willing to give themselves. This fits the description of high perceived value. Would you be willing to visit a dealership for a chance to win a trip to the Super Bowl? Most people would if they were also in the market for a vehicle. The best part is you can insure the cost of this once-in-a-lifetime trip so that your dealership only pays a fraction of the cost and can guarantee there will be a person who wins—if they show up at the dealership with the winning number.

Maximize Your Incentives

Utilize microsites and give your customers a gift if they RSVP for an appointment. Wouldn’t it be worth the $500 to gather valuable information from customers on the RSVP microsite; information you can use to help sell vehicles before your promotion even starts? Plus, that same information can be used for your future campaigns.

So don’t worry about gift seekers. If your campaign is done properly and creatively, a gift is a strong tool that will motivate customers and drive high quality traffic directly to your dealership.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2013/07/how-to-motivate-your-customer/

Gene Daughtry

Why the difference in price?

consumer-protectionIn my 16 years in Buy Here, Pay Here operations, we marketed the business as “in-house” or “bad credit” financing. We sold a few cars for cash, but we were predominantly a Dealer-Controller Financing business.  Since the inception of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and its complaint website, consumerfinance.gov/complaint, the FTC is watching these dealers more closely than ever.

There are several resources available to assist automotive dealers avoid illegal and deceptive advertising and marketing practices.  I’ve compiled a short list of links to what I consider the most pertinent, but there are other good resources available, as well:

As a dealer, you must be careful that your salespeople are not telling customers that due to their credit, they cannot purchase the car you advertised for the ad price. You know it happens when the customer is declined for “bank financing” but approved for special financing or second-chance financing. The special financing approval requires a large loan discount. Your salesperson goes out and tells the customer they can get the car they want, but the price will be “x” instead of the advertised price. The same happens if the only way to get a deal approved is through the store’s BHPH operation.

Some independent dealers are primarily “retail” where they offer prime and subprime indirect financing. Some of these dealers will offer a few in-house loans to the right customers. If these dealers offer low prices or payment specials in their advertising, they need to be sure how the above scenario is handled by the salesforce. Many BHPH/LHPH dealers do not advertise prices or payment deals in order to prevent false advertising issues or bait-and-switch pricing. BHPH dealers generally advertise what they do — help the consumer with bad credit. Our message is about services available, vehicle dependability and how we can help most everyone get a vehicle.

I always tell retail dealers that almost every process in their retail operation will be opposite in a BHPH operation. Your salespeople in retail generally up the customer, meet and greet, qualify, test drive, trial close if “we can get the figures right,” then go inside and negotiate.  Then they try to get the deal approved. In BHPH or special financing, after a salesperson ups the customer and begins to qualify, the salesman brings the customer inside to find out if they have an approvable deal, which then determines what vehicles to show them.

If you are doing deals in secondary financing or BHPH, you might consider advertising that does not contain vehicle prices or payments. Those ads open the door for possible FTC violations. With commission salespeople and managers it is hard to resist “converting” customers from one to the other. You probably already know that if your customer has landed on a particular vehicle that is “value priced” online or in other ads, your people cannot legally add a discount fee back to the price and do the deal.

The CFPB’s hotline for consumer complaints is just beginning to be known. As dealers, there are enough headaches to go around without creating them yourself. Market into your primary business and attract the customers that fit your business model.

Gene Daughtry is a BHPH executive conference moderator, trainer and consultant for NCM Associates. He’ll be teaching “BHPH Service Management” June 5-6 in Kansas City and he’ll be a presenter at the National Alliance for Buy Here Pay Here Dealers Conference and Dealer Academy in Las Vegas next week.

If you’re a retail dealer thinking about Buy Here, Pay Here, you’ll want to read Gene’s “Straight Talk About Dealer-Controlled Financing” whitepaper. It will help you understand the differences and similarities between franchised and BHPH operations and explains the various types of BHPH business models you need to consider before getting started. Get your copy here or visit Gene at NABD in the NCM exhibit booth, or at our Open House on May 21 in room Alsace I from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.!

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2013/05/why-the-difference-in-price/