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Kendall Rawls

Kendall Rawls

Author's details

Name: Kendall Rawls
Date registered: March 29, 2017
URL: http://www.rawlsgroup.com

Biography

Kendall Rawls knows and understands the challenges that impact the success of an entrepreneurial owned business. Her unique perspective comes not only from her educational background but, more importantly, from her experience as a second-generation family member employee of The Rawls Group - Business Succession Planners. For more information, visit www.rawlsgroup.com or email kendall@rawlsgroup.com.

Latest posts

  1. Think Like an Owner — June 27, 2017
  2. Generational Tensions: 4 Barriers to Automotive Leadership — April 6, 2017

Author's posts listings

Kendall Rawls

Think Like an Owner

Car salesman

Ownership, as defined by Merriam-Webster, is the state, relation, or fact of being an owner. Often, those who feel ownership of something take special care and feel great responsibility for it. If we dissect the definition of ownership a little more, it does not necessarily mean that one must “own,” but rather, there is a mindset of being or acting like an owner.

This “ownership attitude,” or lack thereof, can be seen in many dealerships. Some leaders may not own stock in the dealership but have ownership in areas of strategic initiatives, team motivation and collaboration, and show emotional investment in the achievement of the dealership’s mission. On the other hand, some leaders show up, fulfill their responsibilities, and get the job done. However, if a better gig presents itself across the street, they don’t hesitate to take the opportunity.

An ownership mentality, whether the actual owner or leader, is a great attitude. It is the state of mind or the accountability we put on ourselves to put care and action into what we own.

Imagine if all key managers and influencers in the dealership had a dealer-minded attitude and made decisions that were always for the betterment of the whole and not just the individual? Take a moment and analyze each leadership role in the organization and identify their level of engagement. Does it appear they lead from a place of “ownership”—meaning, in a way that promotes the organization’s mission, vision, and core values, and nurtures team synergy? Or, are they just performing the duties of the role? Also, it is essential to determine if the key managers think and act as if they have an ownership stake in the dealership. Have they bought into the dealership’s mission, strategic vision, and view the business as their own? When management leads from a place of ownership, the attitude becomes contagious throughout the organization and profitability, performance, growth, and fulfilling long-term strategic plans can become a reality.

So then, how do dealer principals/owners create an owner-centric mindset in those that are not actual owners? Here are a few areas that, if executed with intention, can be game changers:

People Development

Offer learning and training to your people. Providing access to operational training is one area to ensure your people are equipped to succeed. Also, a new and growing area is in the development of soft skills that are focused on self-awareness. Providing access to training cultivates a feeling of loyalty amongst your people. Investing in their success motivates people to want to invest in the dealership’s success.

Leadership Development

Rather than a culture where managers lead from positional power—“I’m your boss, so do what I say”—invest in leadership development to create an accountability culture based on coaching. Leadership influences others’ choices, priorities, and behavior. Power and position may create compliance in your organization, but it will also create challenges in nurturing a sense of buy-in to your organization’s mission and vision, thus ultimately demotivating employee loyalty and their drive to go above and beyond the call of duty. As our industry evolves due to technological advancements, changing consumer behavior and demographic shifts, position, and power fall short of inspiring people. There are too many competitors recruiting for good talent which is making it harder to retain the movers and shakers in the organization. As such, it’s imperative to foster an environment where people are inspired, respected, and empowered which helps them want to stick around.

Self-Awareness

Understanding one’s own personality/management style and how it interacts with others is one of the biggest leadership game changers out there. Be willing to do a self-assessment and provide the same assessment to your key leaders and teams to create an understanding of natural leadership and communication qualities and traits. Go a step further and provide coaching to key leaders and rising stars to develop flexibility in how to work with a diverse team.

People development, self-awareness, and development of leadership soft-skills are game changers for current and future leaders. Enabling and empowering managers to build a foundation for future growth, sustainability, and a culture of ownership throughout the organization. To do this, managers and the dealer principal/owner need to learn how to think differently in this changing industry.

Learn more about the NCM-Rawls Dealer Executive Program and how it can prepare you and your successors to lead your dealership into the future.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2017/06/think-like-an-owner/

Kendall Rawls

Generational Tensions: 4 Barriers to Automotive Leadership

Stressed boss and her female colleagues posing in office

Ensuring the future success and sustainability of a dealership is not based solely on operational knowledge and efficiencies. In addition to creating robust processes, identifying and developing future leaders is critical to building sustainable dealership value. But first, you must overcome the leadership barriers that sabotage your goals.

Generational tensions

In the past, when someone took on the position of “dealer,” it was assumed employees would fall in line and follow the owner’s lead. Today, with up to five generations working together at the same dealership, this expectation doesn’t hold true. Instead, good people check out or leave after a transition in leadership if they don’t feel respected for their contributions and see opportunities for growth.

Generation X and even the up-and-coming Gen Y/millennial leaders have to navigate an additional barrier that can be awkward and uncomfortable. These up-and-comers must earn the respect of the team around them for them to be seen as a true leader. This is a drastic shift in leadership from previous generations where moving into the dealer role was an expectation given tenure and relationships in the dealership.

Contributing to the problem is that the automotive industry has changed so much. No longer is real-life knowledge and experience enough to sustain and lead a dealership into the future. Innovations in technology, a lingering fear of economic uncertainty, ongoing regulatory changes and generational perspectives of “old school” and “new school” way of thinking can build organizational tensions, impacting performance. Put simply, what may have been good enough previously is no longer good enough to lead your organization into the future—instead, formal education, operational training, and a thorough understanding of best practices will be key.

The “old school” versus “new school” issue often causes Gen X and millennial team members to conflict with their baby boomer leaders and employees about fundamental issues impacting the business, such as:

  • What work means. Perspectives of how work fits into our lives—the type of work culture one finds inspiring and the gratification they want from their career—are in constant flux. It’s not uncommon for Gen X and millennial workers to want more time outside the dealership, and older employees/leaders may interpret this as poor work ethic.
  • The nature of leadership. Generational perspectives on who should be considered for leadership may differ. Some feel leadership positions should be earned through tenure, while others think it is earned through performance.
  • How the pecking order works. When performance is rewarded over tenure, older staff may struggle with accepting the authority of younger personnel in more senior positions. (This is especially problematic for employees in family business—heavily scrutinized, your advancement may be viewed as favoritism.) This volatile mix can send an entire dealership into chaos. Loyal employees feel betrayed, and rising stars can find that they lack the buy-in to make changes. After all, the best operations person in the world can’t accomplish a thing without employee support!
  • How to lead effectively. Differences in leadership styles can damage relationships. There are some leaders who feel that motivating others is best done through a directive approach – “Do what I say because I hold the power.” Others appreciate and are driven more by personal influence – “I feel respected for my contributions. I understand the mission; so, I am on board.”

Although they can be subtle, these dynamics impact you and your developing leader’s ability to build respect and trust, as well as motivate and inspire your team to commit to the organizational mission and vision.

Leadership challenges derail performance

If you want to ensure your dealership is driven by strong leadership—today or in the future—knowing how to inspire a variety of people and having the necessary skills to stay operationally cutting-edge are two critical leadership barriers you and any developing leader must overcome.

However, you cannot address these problems simply by working in or “growing up” in the dealership. That’s why The Rawls Group partnered with NCM Associates to create the NCM-Rawls Dealer Executive Program™. The NCM-Rawls Dealer Executive Program™ combines NCM’s operational excellence and Rawls’ deep understanding of how to develop a high-performing dealership culture. Our collaboration allows us to go deeper into leadership development and tackle some of the harder issues and topics that most programs are afraid—or do not have the knowledge and expertise—to offer.

Whether you work with NCM-Rawls or pursue learning on your own, I urge you to think differently about how you want to lead. Choose to invest in yourself, as well as future leaders, to build solid leadership skills based on knowledge and real experience gained working in the dealership. If you do so, I’m confident that you will not only overcome these leadership barriers, you’ll create a thriving dealership for years to come.

Learn more about the NCM-Rawls Dealer Executive Program and how it can prepare you and your successors to lead your dealership into the future.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2017/04/generational-tensions-4-barriers-to-automotive-leadership/