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Jeremy Anwyl

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Is Your Auto Dealership’s Sales Process Customer-Approved?

Today, we’re introducing a new Guest Expert to the Up To Speed blog. Jeremy Anwyl, Vice Chairman of Edmunds.com will be contributing a series of articles on consumer-centric and cost-efficient marketing strategies for automotive dealerships.

customer-approvedEvery few months or so we have groups of dealers visit the Edmunds office in Santa Monica. The idea is to get “street level” market feedback and stay current on any issues dealers might be wrestling with.Along these lines, we also get together with consumers regularly to develop insights and understanding on their views on the vehicle buying process.

Some time ago we had a group of dealers in and decided to try to bridge the two exercises; basically, to get dealers thinking like consumers.To make this work, we asked to dealers to participate in the following exercise:“Imagine you have been asked to deliver the keynote at a fictional prestigious automotive conference. (Think TED for autos.)

Your selection was based on how you have reshaped the retail sales process, removed customer pain points and achieved a remarkable level of business success. In your speech, you share your secrets.”We split the dealers into two groups and give each 40 minutes to outline their speech. I found the result interesting.

Here’s the combined work from the two groups: First, the dealers identified the pain points; the things that consumers valued, but also found frustrating.

Pain point #1.  It just takes too long. The dealer nailed this one; it is a recurring theme from consumers as well. The interesting thing in talking with customers is that it is not the entire process that takes too long.  Some aspects of buying a new vehicle consumers actually enjoy. Things like checking out options or touring/viewing vehicles in inventory. Some dealers are trying out an extended delivery at the consumer’s home that consumers really like, as well. The parts of the process that take too long and the customers don’t enjoy, are getting in and out of F & I, and the back and forth of negotiations.To address these areas, the dealers talked about how they launched digital contracts, where most of the consumer and deal information could be entered online. They also proposed integrating the tools that consumers use across the Internet so the same information doesn’t have to be entered over and over again. The dealers didn’t focus on this, but it would also seem to emphasize that customers set appointments before coming into the store so the personnel can be ready and waiting.

Pain point #2.  The customer worries about paying too much. (Ripped off, using the dealers’ words.) The dealers proposed transparent pricing as the solution.

“Transparency” is a catch all term these days. Sometimes it means access to info on what other consumers paid for the same vehicle. In this context, the dealers were referring to pricing info that is freely available, with no or limited negotiation.

This worried the dealers a bit as they made the leap that if/when this kind of transparency arrives it is going to drive down margins. There is a tension they expressed as “new world pricing with old world expenses.” The dealers correctly see being more efficient as being essential to survival in the future. But also feel they are being pulled in the opposite direction by manufacturer demands for facility upgrades, etc.

The risk that margin pressure will increase is real, but there is also a chance we might be surprised in how this plays out. So far, transparency has been about a single price; specifically, a new vehicle price. But we all know that a deal involves many elements. The new vehicle price is just one.

Testing a theory, I asked our analysts to run some data. They ranked a set of new vehicle transactions, in order, based on the new vehicle gross. This ranked list was divided into four groups.

My suspicion was that for deals with a lower new vehicle margin, dealers work harder to make up for the “loss” by pushing for higher margins in other areas.   (Think of the old four square.) Charging a bit more for the loan, or offering a bit less for the trade. This might not work in all cases, but across a broad enough number of deals a pattern should emerge.

The group with the highest new vehicle margin was a bit of a surprise in that the interest rate paid was also higher and the appraised value lower than the other groups. Apparently there is a group of consumers—even today—that makes a mess of buying a vehicle. They pay way over the norms in all areas. (They averaged paying over $2,000 more overall!) Let’s forget this group for a moment.

There is also a small subset of the deal with the lowest margins. These buyers are very savvy shoppers who are willing to put enormous time into getting the absolutely lowest price, often have no trade and don’t use dealer financing.  Let’s ignore this group as well.

Looking at the remaining transactions—roughly 60% of the market— there is a pattern where the new vehicle gross and the margin on other deal elements are inversely correlated.

Seems to me that this accounts for much of the frustration that consumers associate with vehicle purchases. The greater the focus on the new vehicle price, the greater the level frustration with the overall negotiation.

The dealers see a future with more transparent pricing around all the elements of a deal. What is preventing dealers moving in this direction today is the fear that offering this level of transparency will just make it easier for consumers to take the new vehicle price and shop another dealership; a dealership where it is simple enough for a salesperson to offer a lower price and work to make it up on the trade, etc.

The irony is that consumer behavior is the impediment to consumers getting the simplicity and straightforwardness they crave. The dealers didn’t have a solution for this, but it is clearly a puzzle we need to figure out.

The final pain point: Confidence in making a purchase.  I put this pain point in my own words as the dealers were focused on the customer feedback that is scattered around the Internet. I rephrased this because what we see consumers looking for when they look at customer feedback is the assurance that the vehicle and/or dealership will perform as promised. One way to ease this concern is to look at the experience of other customers.

As the dealers pointed out, currently this feedback is a bit of a mess; some is useful, much is not. There also is no single source—either for the consumers to rely upon or the dealers to stay on top of.

As I think about this area, it is clear that if we focus on the pain point for the consumer, there are ways to deliver confidence that don’t involve customer reviews. Referrals, for example, are a source of business for dealerships where the store has great credibility. (A customer is hardly going to refer a store to a friend if they had a bad experience.)

I am not sure that customer feedback on the Internet is going to prove to be the best way for customers to feel confident about a decision. The source data is just so unreliable. But in identifying this pain point, the dealers again tied closely to what we have been hearing from consumers.

In fact, that is what struck me the most about this exercise with the dealers.  They get it. What consumers are looking for in the sales process is not a mystery. (We are hearing the same things from consumers as well.) What may be a mystery is figuring out how to remove these pain points in a way that supports a profitable business.

I have some thoughts on this that I will start to explore in the next article.

Jeremy_Anwyl

Jeremy Anwyl began his auto industry career in 1979 working with auto dealers who were looking for more consumer-centric and cost efficient ways of marketing. In 1991 he began working with manufacturers—again on projects that focused on retailing and marketing efficiency. Anwyl joined Edmunds in late 1999 where his years of experience working with dealers and the manufacturers on retail opportunities have been a key part of Edmunds’ success. To reach Jeremy, tweet @JeremyAnwyl, call 310.309.6393 or email janwyl@edmunds.com.

About the author

Jeremy Anwyl

Jeremy Anwyl

Jeremy Anwyl is the former vice chairman of Edmunds.com. He began his auto industry career in 1979 by working with auto dealers who were looking for more consumer-centric and cost efficient ways of marketing. Together, Anwyl and his dealer clients rapidly developed new ideas; learned what worked and along the way exploded many of the notions that many dealers held as marketing “truths.” For ten years Anwyl worked with hundreds of dealers and surveyed hundreds of thousands of consumers. In 1991 he leveraged the experience gained the previous decade and began working with manufacturers—again on projects that focused on retailing and marketing efficiency. Notable projects include retail best practice studies for Lexus and Toyota, numerous CPO pilots and program designs, several customer satisfaction improvement projects, custom research assignments, conferences and more. He joined Edmunds in late 1999 where his years of experience working with dealers and the manufacturers on retail opportunities has been a key part of Edmunds success.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.ncm20.com/2013/04/is-your-auto-dealerships-sales-process-customer-approved/

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